Tuesday, March 23, 2010

FO: Kureyon Sock Cardigan

This is Design 11 from Noro Catwalk 2 by Jenny Watson. I was excited to finally get to try Kureyon Sock, and I liked working with it. For this project, I made no attempt to control the striping. I grabbed skeins at random as they ran out and always pulled from the center. As for modifications, I made the sleeves about an inch shorter than called for. They are still quite long. I knit the collar in one piece. I have a strict rule about no seams at the back of the neck. Maybe it is not so bad for people with long hair, but I won't tolerate it. When I got to the halfway point I reversed the short row shaping and kept going to the end. If I were doing it again, I would probably work the sleeves in the round and perhaps narrow the upper arm a little. I think this sweater is going to be perfect for throwing on in the evenings when it gets cold.

3 comments:

Bogie said...

Beautiful, congratulations!

Judy said...

Hi,

I just found your sweater as I have started it myself. I love yours.

I had a couple of questions.

Could you please tell me how you made the collar all one piece?

Secondly, how long was the back sides of the 3 pieces you have to knit? It looks like 3 squares with the 3 stitch garter on the edges?

I love the style of this sweater.

Thank you,

Judy, Seabrookknitter

SpinalCat said...

Hi, Judy
Sorry it took me so long to get back to you. I didn't write down what I did and I don't have the pattern to refer to anymore. Basically for the collar, I followed the instructions as written for the first half. I then worked a row or 2 plain and worked the short rows in reverse. In the first half of the collar, you work fewer and fewer stitches. The short rows are just on the outer edge, they don't go all the way to the inner neck edge. For the second half, the short rows got longer and longer at the same rate. After the short rows, I just kept working until the piece was long enough. I pinned it in place when I got close to being done so I could measure it against the actual garment instead of going by measurements.
I'm not sure what you meant by your second question. I don't recall if the pattern has a schematic or not. If not, the finished lengths can be calculated from the gauge and instructions.